Feed on
Posts
Comments

Calliope Hummingbird

I didn’t show you all my hummingbird pictures from Arizona.  I wanted to save a couple.  The Calliope Hummingbird is the smallest of all hummingbirds.  The males have streaky pink feathers under their chins.

Depending on the angle of the sun, the streaks are more or less obvious.  This are the same two birds on the left in different light.

The females look like female Rufous Hummingbirds, but with more rufous color on their tail feathers.  I am not even close to being skilled enough to take a guess at which females were Calliopes.  But hey, there might be one in this picture because there are so many hummingbirds!

That must have been some good syrup!

 

6 Responses to “Calliope Hummingbird”

  1. I’ve never seen so many hummingbirds around one feeder. Great capture!

  2. Elizabeth says:

    I know, right? Even when I lived in California I think the most I ever got was two.

  3. Tiffany says:

    Most I’ve ever had is 4 – Anna’s breathe fire lol. Great photos – love the males streaky chin. Did they seem significantly small than the others?

    On the weekend, I saw an Allen’s defending a feeder (not mine) from a female Anna’s… she hid in bougainvillea.

  4. Elizabeth says:

    Nice! Hummingbirds crack me up when they fight.

    The Calliope looked just like the others. The Calliope is only 2.75 inches long compared with 3.9 inches for a Broad-billed Hummingbird, which was the most common bird around those feeders. So you’d think I would have noticed a difference in size, but I’m not observant enough.

  5. Katherine says:

    For the two weeks we were in NH this summer we had three hummingbirds competing for the feeder every day. The same one won every contest I saw, though the other two never seemed to give up.

  6. Elizabeth says:

    Hey Katherine! Yes, I remember how intensely competitive the hummers were in NH. These guys weren’t ever close to being that aggressive, which is good because it can be self defeating. Some humming birds will try to defend multiple feeders and completely tire themselves out in the process.