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On Mount Emei, if you hike for about five miles you can find some Tibetan Macaques.  When the females are ready to mate, their faces turn red.

 

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These monkeys live in the wild, but tourists feed them.  As a result, they jump on people so that they can search their pockets for food.  One monkey even tried to steal a mitten from my jacket pocket.  I would have preferred to see them in a more natural habitat and not so used to people, but what are you going to do?

 

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Also, people in Chengdu don’t care too much about keeping the area clean so it’s filled with trash.  It’s really changed my perspective.  When I run to work in the morning now all I can see is the trash by the side of the road.  What’s wrong with us?  Why does everything have to be wrapped in plastic?  There’s a pile of plastic the size of Texas floating around the Atlantic Ocean.  It’s called the Gyre.  If you want to have a good cry, checkout this link and all the birds that eat plastic thinking it’s food.  They starve to death.  So I feel like this image is pretty emblematic of the problem:

 

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Kathy linked to this amazing invention, though, where this kid has invented a contraption to capture the plastic.  Here’s the video of Boyan Slat’s Ted Talk.  And, on to better pictures!  These are baby monkeys.  Their faces are really expressive.

 

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Their hands look a lot like ours.

 

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5 Responses to “Tibetan Macaques on Mt. Emei”

  1. Samantha says:

    I had no idea about the Pacific Garbage Patch. Thank you for sharing, so sad.
    I love the pics of the birds in China, they look so normal, yet exotic!
    I am excited our university has put up a webcam of urban breeding Peregrines, if you’re interested, they are cute to watch (this is how I pass my day now…) http://efm.dept.shef.ac.uk/peregrine/

  2. Elizabeth says:

    Thanks for the webcam link! We have a webcam for nesting peregrines in SLC (http://wildlife.utah.gov/dwr/learn-more/peregrine-cam.html), but they haven’t started breeding yet so I can get my fix from your link. I like the ones in SLC because I can walk up the street from work and check them out during my lunch break.

    Also, your tumblr is super cute!

  3. Samantha says:

    Thanks! I was inspired by your “political campaigns,” and Mr. B acts like he owns everything already anyways.

  4. Tiffany says:

    I would be so bummed to see heaps of garbage; the monkeys are interesting, but I’d rather see them in a natural environment too.

    There’s a plastic gyre in every ocean, but the Pacific one is the most well known. The pictures of the baby albatross stuffed with plastic are chilling. I don’t know why everything has to be wrapped in plastic too – we try our best and pick up garbage all the time too. Honestly, I don’t think there is anything more depressing to me than all this plastic shit we have swirling about and the animals who die because of it.

  5. Elizabeth says:

    I completely agree. I’ve been trying to buy more fresh vegetables to reduce the amount of plastic and metal we create. And this summer I’m going to be much better about eating from the garden because what’s better than eating your own food?!